NAIDOC Week 2016 – 3 July to 10 July

NAIDOC Week 2016 – 3 July to 10 July

  • Published on Sunday, July 3, 2016

NAIDOC stands for National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee.

NAIDOC Week celebrations are held across Australia each July to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. NAIDOC is celebrated not only in Indigenous communities, but by Australians from all walks of life.

Its origins can be traced to the emergence of Aboriginal groups in the 1920s which sought to increase awareness in the wider community of the status and treatment of Indigenous Australians.

NAIDOC Week is a time to celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and an opportunity to recognise the contributions Indigenous Australians make to our country and our society.

MEGT encourages all Australians to participate in the celebrations and activities that take place across the nation during NAIDOC Week.

A brief history

1956 – 1990

Major Aboriginal organisations, state and federal governments, and a number of church groups all supported the formation of the National Aborigines Day Observance Committee (NADOC). At the same time, the second Sunday in July became a day of remembrance for Aboriginal people and their heritage. In 1975, the NADOC committee decided that the event should cover a week, from the first to second Sunday in July.

1991 – Present

With a growing awareness of the distinct cultural histories of Australia’s Indigenous people, NADOC was expanded to recognise Torres Strait Islander people and culture. The committee then became known as the National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC). This new name has become the title for the whole week, not just the day. Each year, a theme is chosen to reflect the important issues and events for NAIDOC Week.

The theme for 2016 is Songlines: The living narrative of our nation.

For more information on events happening in your state visit the NAIDOC Week website.